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laughingsquid:

Art Show Featuring New Work by Kirk Demarais & Dave MacDowell
teamcoco:

Inspired by the Heart Attack Grill, it’s the “What the Hell is Wrong with You, You Have a Family, Stop Eating Like This” Restaurant! [Slideshow]

You know your’e in trouble when the best health advice you can get is from Conan!

teamcoco:

Inspired by the Heart Attack Grill, it’s the “What the Hell is Wrong with You, You Have a Family, Stop Eating Like This” Restaurant! [Slideshow]

You know your’e in trouble when the best health advice you can get is from Conan!

pbsthisdayinhistory:

MARCH 23, 1903 

WRIGHT BROTHERS APPLY FOR PATENT FOR THEIR “FLYING MACHINE”

On March 23, 1903, the Wrights applied for their famous patent for a “Flying Machine.”

In December of that same year, the Wright brothers flew their “Flyer” four times, with their longest flight lasting 59 seconds and covering 852 feet.

With these flights, they became the first to successfully pilot a power-drive, heavier-tan-air machine.

Play NOVA’s “Pilot the 1903 Flyer” interactive to see how the Wrights piloted their plane.

Seemed like an appropriate footnote for “this day in history” while waiting on my overbooked United flight at SkyHarbor International in Phoenix.

lookhigh:

It was 50 years ago today that Bobby Z learned to play…
(via Album Cover Gallery: Bob Dylan’s Album Covers, 1962-1979)

lookhigh:

It was 50 years ago today that Bobby Z learned to play…

(via Album Cover Gallery: Bob Dylan’s Album Covers, 1962-1979)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Balto (1933)
For those fans of poorly made animated movies of the 1990s, the name Balto will be familiar. For those who aren’t, Balto was an Alaskan sled dog who was famous for running the last two legs of a miles-long journey in a blizzard to bring diptheria serum to Nome to end a fast-moving epidemic. Balto was the lead dog for Gunnar Kaasen who risked his own life and suffered frostbite running his dogs for over 24 straight hours (missing a pass off point) and collapsing upon arriving in Nome. His words as he fell were “damn fine dog.” Balto became a national hero, although he and Kaasen were only one of twenty teams to complete the journey. Balto’s fame led to the commission of a bronze likeness by the city of New York in Central Park (near the Children’s Zoo) even though the city had no direct connection to the dog or Kaasen. When Balto died on March 14, 1933 his body was donated to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History where it was preserved (ok, stuffed) and put on display, and remains so to this day. (See above)
Balto’s heroics are not without some controversy.  Although Balto led the last team, many historians believe that the true heroes of the run were Leonhard Seppala and his pack leader, Togo who covered 84 miles in a single day and a total of 250 miles, including the “commute” from their home to their pick-up point. Unfortunately for Togo, it was the dog that finished the journey who received all the accolades…and a 1995 animated film with voice by Kevin Bacon.
(Image of Balto in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is courtesy of fortunecity.com)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Balto (1933)

For those fans of poorly made animated movies of the 1990s, the name Balto will be familiar. For those who aren’t, Balto was an Alaskan sled dog who was famous for running the last two legs of a miles-long journey in a blizzard to bring diptheria serum to Nome to end a fast-moving epidemic. Balto was the lead dog for Gunnar Kaasen who risked his own life and suffered frostbite running his dogs for over 24 straight hours (missing a pass off point) and collapsing upon arriving in Nome. His words as he fell were “damn fine dog.” Balto became a national hero, although he and Kaasen were only one of twenty teams to complete the journey. Balto’s fame led to the commission of a bronze likeness by the city of New York in Central Park (near the Children’s Zoo) even though the city had no direct connection to the dog or Kaasen. When Balto died on March 14, 1933 his body was donated to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History where it was preserved (ok, stuffed) and put on display, and remains so to this day. (See above)

Balto’s heroics are not without some controversy.  Although Balto led the last team, many historians believe that the true heroes of the run were Leonhard Seppala and his pack leader, Togo who covered 84 miles in a single day and a total of 250 miles, including the “commute” from their home to their pick-up point. Unfortunately for Togo, it was the dog that finished the journey who received all the accolades…and a 1995 animated film with voice by Kevin Bacon.

(Image of Balto in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is courtesy of fortunecity.com)

newyorker:

Lovings at Home

In 1950, a young man from Central Point, Virginia, went seven miles down the road to hear some music. Seven brothers named the Jeters were on that night, playing bluegrass in a farmhouse. The young man had come for the music, but couldn’t help noticing a young woman in the audience. The man, Richard Loving, was white; the woman, Mildred Jeter, was black and Cherokee. Seventeen years later, as a result of their meeting, the Supreme Court struck down Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act, along with anti-miscegenation laws in fifteen other states, ending the legal prohibitions against interracial marriage.

On view until May 6th at the International Center of Photography, “The Loving Story” highlights the human element of the Loving v. Virginia case, bringing the ardor that fueled the Lovings’ half-decade of appeals into heart-rending focus…

- For more selection of photographs of Richard and Mildred Loving: http://nyr.kr/wLrC3t
seanlennon:

Thanks everyone for kind words today. Love, Sean

seanlennon:

Thanks everyone for kind words today. Love, Sean

npr:

life: Did you know? — On this day 98 years ago, Henry Ford rolled out the very first moving assembly line to create cars. His method of mass production via assembly line is better known as “Fordism.”

To honor Ford, let’s take a look at one of his most beloved cars of all time: the Mustang. Production of the Mustang began in March, 1964; the new car was introduced to the public on April 17, 1964, at the New York World’s Fair in Queens, and quickly became both an icon and one of the most successful car models in automotive history
(see more — American Classic: Ford Mustang)

npr:

life: Did you know? — On this day 98 years ago, Henry Ford rolled out the very first moving assembly line to create cars. His method of mass production via assembly line is better known as “Fordism.”

To honor Ford, let’s take a look at one of his most beloved cars of all time: the Mustang. Production of the Mustang began in March, 1964; the new car was introduced to the public on April 17, 1964, at the New York World’s Fair in Queens, and quickly became both an icon and one of the most successful car models in automotive history

(see moreAmerican Classic: Ford Mustang)

cjchivers:

The title of this post is taken from the background of a photograph made today by Joao Silva, as he completed his first marathon after losing his legs last year to a PMN landmine near the Arghandab River in Afghanistan. That’s Joao in the iPhone-made image above.

To see…